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Nashville Planned Parenthood Clinic Suspends Abortion Services

Nashville’s only remaining abortion provider has suspended its abortion services indefinitely because it could not find a physician to perform the abortions.

The Nashville office of Planned Parenthood of Tennessee and North Mississippi, the largest provider of abortions in the state, is now referring clients to clinics in Knoxville and Memphis.

The decision to stop offering abortion services has resulted in Tennessee Right to Life receiving an increase in calls from desperate pregnant women wanting abortions, giving the pro-life group an opportunity to introduce these women to life-affirming pregnancy care options.

In August, the Women’s Center abortion facility in Nashville also closed after almost three decades of aborting unborn babies.

Tennessee now has six abortion providers, down from 16 in 2000.

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State Loses Two Respected Former Lawmakers

This week, two former members of the Tennessee General Assembly passed away.

Retired Rep. Charles Sargent (R-Franklin) died at 73 after battling cancer. Sargent first began his service in the Legislature in 1996 and chaired the House Finance, Ways, and Means Committee for the last eight years.

Former Sen. Ben Atchley, age 88, retired from the Senate in 2003. He served in the Legislature for 32 years, the last 16 as the Senate’s top-ranking Republican. He served under the terms of six governors.

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Bill Lee and Marsha Blackburn

Reflections on the 2018 General Election

Yesterday’s election did not bring much partisan change to Tennessee’s political landscape, as Republicans still control the state’s executive and legislative branches as well as the state’s congressional delegation. Here is a short breakdown of what happened.

Statewide Races

Bill Lee, who had never run for any political office, handily won the race for Governor and former state Senator and Congressman, Marsha Blackburn, won the race for U.S. Senate by a comfortable margin. The margins of defeat for very politically credible Democratic candidates had to be very disappointing to the Democratic Party, which may find their more moderate members deciding to vote in Republican primaries in the future in order to have some voice in who represents them.

State Legislative Races

In the state House of Representatives, Republicans lost two seats, picked up one seat, and, thus, continue to hold a super-majority. The seat held for years by Republican Beth Harwell was narrowly won by Democrat Bob Freeman and incumbent Republican Eddie Smith of Knoxville was defeated by the Democrat incumbent he had beaten four years ago, Gloria Johnson. Republican Chris Hurt picked up the seat vacated by Democrat Craig Fitzhugh, who retired to run for governor in the Democratic primary.

All incumbents in the state Senate, Republicans and Democrats alike, won reelection, though the Senate will have three new faces. Republican Representative Dawn White will fill the seat previously held by Republican Bill Ketron, and Democratic Representative Brenda Gilmore and Democrat Katrina Robinson will fill seats vacated by Democrats.

U.S. House Races

All incumbent members of the U.S. House of Representatives, Republican and Democrat alike, won reelection. Republicans also retained control of two open seats in the U.S. House. Now-former state Senator Mark Green will fill the U.S. House seat vacated by Senator-elect Marsha Blackburn.  Former state Senator and retiring Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett will fill the seat vacated by Republican Congressman Jimmy Duncan.

View all election results.

With the 2018 election cycle in the books, there is one thing for which all Tennesseans—Democrats, Republicans, and Independents—can give thanks this morning. All the political advertisements on television and radio, along with the political mail cluttering our mailboxes, have stopped!

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Do You Know Who You Will Vote For?

Early voting continues through next Thursday, November 1. This is an opportune time to check out how your candidates in your House and Senate districts view important issues by going to TNVoterGuide.org. Either click on the “Find a Candidate” button or the “Candidate Comparison” button to compare all candidates in your district. We want you to be an informed voter, so don’t forget to study this valuable Voter Guide resource. And be sure to share it with your friends and family!

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Silenced Tennessee Pastor Fights Back for Unborn

Pastor Mark Carr is pushing back against the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services (TDCS) and its attempts to shut down his website chastizing the department for effectively facilitating an out-of-state abortion for a 13-year-old teen from Sevier County against parental wishes.

TDCS had previously removed the teen and her three siblings from their parents’ custody. After the teen’s caregiver made provisions for her to receive an abortion in Atlanta, pastor Carr developed his “Johnathan’s Law” website in honor of the aborted child, who was aborted at 21 weeks. TDCS filed a motion in the Sevier County Juvenile Court asking that the website be taken down leading Carr’s attorney to file a “Notice of Removal” in federal court asking it to take the case from the Juvenile Court and block the TDCS attempt to violate his First Amendment rights to free speech.

“We are working to get laws passed to prohibit something like this from ever happening again,” the “Johnathan’s Law” website reads. “We believe no 13-year-old girl should be taken to another state to murder a baby when that murder is illegal in Tennessee. Those that do these things need to be exposed and brought to justice.”

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