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TN House Votes to Rebuke Nashville and Memphis

Nashville and Memphis city governments don’t like the state’s criminal marijuana possession law. They could ask the state to let them make possession a local civil offense, but that’s too much trouble and the Legislature might not agree. So they simply passed ordinances anyway, letting police officers decide to circumvent the state’s criminal law by citing offenders for a civil violation of a city ordinance on the subject. Thursday, the state House voted overwhelmingly to “repeal” the local ordinances. Speaker Beth Harwell, who is considering a bid for governor and, as such, would be charged with faithfully executing the state’s laws, voted with the Democrats and five other Republicans to allow the cities to continue flaunting the state’s law.

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Canadian Doctors Reconsider Physician-Assisted Suicide

Last year, voters in Canada approved a Medical Aid in Dying law that allows physicians to voluntarily help terminally ill patients end their lives, and many physicians agreed with the legislation. But now 24 doctors in Ontario have removed themselves from a list of those willing to assist in suicide and another 30 doctors have put themselves on temporary hold due to second thoughts. John Stonestreet, with the Colson Center for Christian Worldview, said the “reaction isn’t surprising, given the Hippocratic Oath every doctor takes, vowing to ‘do no harm’ to patients. These doctors started out philosophically supportive of euthanasia . . . and then reality set in. The human conscience—and the law of God written on our hearts—are powerful things indeed.”

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Air Force Email States ‘Boy’ and ‘Girl’ Are Offensive Terms

According to an email sent by a senior Air Force leader to airmen at Lackland Air Force Base, the words “boy” and “girl” were among the list of words and phrases that “may be construed offensive.” The email asked the airmen to “please be cognizant that such conduct is 100 percent zero tolerance in or outside of the work climate.” We guess the word “airmen” will now need to be changed to “airpeople.”

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SCOTUS Nomination of Gorsuch and Abortion-Related Laws

The Judiciary Committee hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court start March 20, and the legal team at Americans United for Life will be pinpointing discussions during those hearings related to abortion. To stay educated, visit their Scotus 101 project.

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Birth Control App Awaits FDA Approval

If approved by the FDA, Natural Cycles would be the first government-approved, non-drug option for birth control. The natural family planning app, developed by Swedish nuclear physicist Elina Berglund Scherwitzl and her husband, Dr. Raoul Scherwitz, tracks a woman’s ovulation cycle using an algorithm. In a peer-reviewed study of 4,000 women, the app was 93 percent effective at preventing pregnancy compared to the 91 percent effectiveness of the birth control pill. The app is available on iPhones, iPads, Android devices or any device with a browser.

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