Is Quitting the Best Way to Defend Marriage?

This week I couldn’t help but think of what Hall of Fame football coach Vince Lombardi once said, “Winners never quit and quitters never win.” It came to mind when I learned a national organization I respect was quitting on the most important issue of our time.

This week I learned that a legal organization I respect and have supported financially was closing its “Marriage and Family” division. They had reached the pragmatic (they would say “prudential”) conclusion that it wasn’t a good use of time to continue the fight for the biblical and historic definition of marriage by seeking ways to get the issue back before the United States Supreme Court.

In my opinion, the Supreme Court’s Obergefell decision is the Dred Scott and Roe v. Wade decision of our generation. Yet going forward this organization is going to defend marriage only in the context of the religious liberty rights of those who have a biblical view of marriage.

I am all for that, but same-sex “marriage” is perhaps the greatest threat to religious liberty and freedom of conscience there is! To concede that Courts can change the millennia-old meaning of marriage is to concede religious liberty in time. Cannot the 200-year-old meaning of “free exercise” in the First Amendment be changed, too? Of course it can.

Sadly, this organization is not alone. Recently, a friend in a meeting hosted by a national organization featuring a number of national players said many spoke as if the U.S. Supreme Court had legally amended state marriage statutes by judicial fiat, changing the words “male and female” in the marriage license statutes to “party 1 and party 2.”

I couldn’t help but think, Can’t we at least talk about the issue in a way that makes sure our folks know that the Court was lawless and that it did what no court has ever attempted to do before? How will we ever get people to rise up and demand judicial reform if they think the courts are doing what they are supposed to be doing?

And, of course, there was no talk of finding a way to attack, undermine, or limit the Obergefell decision. None!

In contrast, in After the Ball—How America Will Conquer Its Fear & Hatred of Gays in the 90’s, Marshall Kirk and Hunter Madsen wrote that the LGBT community had to take on “antigay actions.” The “first class of actions” in which they had to engage was to attack “laws which criminalize the sex acts commonly associated with homosexuality”—state sodomy laws. And they did.

Repealing those laws went quickly in some areas of the country, but then progress began to slow go. So they resorted to their trusted friend, the federal courts, to strike down all the remaining laws at once. In 1986 that tactic hit a roadblock. In Bowers v. Hardwick, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that state sodomy statutes were not unconstitutional.

But the LGBT community did not quit, like our side is doing with marriage. Instead they turned to state court lawsuits to get the state courts to find the protection for homosexual behavior that Bowers said was not in the U.S. Constitution.

They won multiple times in state court, and then they returned to federal courts with five different lawsuits to raise a narrower issue than a right to homosexual conduct—i.e., the right to equal protection based on the fact that some states only criminalized homosexual sodomy, not heterosexual sodomy.

Lawrence v. Texas in 2003 was the result—all state sodomy laws were declared unconstitutional. Seventeen years of fighting in the courts, and they finally got what they were denied in Bowers! And twelve years later, Lawrence v. Texas became the foundation for Obergefell and same-sex “marriage.”

For what it is worth, the organization I lead is not giving up. We are following the path followed to overturn the sodomy laws. We’ve filed actions in state court and are looking at getting involved in yet another. We are narrowing the scope of the issues, rather than attacking Obergefell head on.

Will we win? I don’t know. But I know Lombardi was right—quitters never win.


David Fowler served in the Tennessee state Senate for 12 years before joining FACT as President in 2006. Read David’s complete bio.

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